Journal of Human Reproductive Sciences

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2014  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 136--142

Prevalence of abnormal spermatozoa in tobacco chewing sub-fertile males


Priyadarsini Sunanda1, Babita Panda1, Chidananda Dash1, Priyadarshi K Ray2, Rabindra N Padhy3, Padmanav Routray4 
1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Center for Human Reproduction, Institute of Medical Sciences and SUM Hospital, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
2 Nano-Medicine Laboratory, Institute of Life Sciences, Nalco Square, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
3 Central Research Laboratory, Institute of Medical Sciences and SUM Hospital, Siksha O Anusandhan University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
4 Aquaculture Production and Environment Division, Central Institute of Freshwater Aquaculture, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India

Correspondence Address:
Babita Panda
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Center for Human Reproduction, Institute of Medical Sciences and SUM Hospital, K8, Kalinga Nagar, Bhubaneswar - 751 003, Odisha
India

Aim : The aim of the following study is to find out the prevalence of abnormal spermatozoa and associated functional parameters in clinical semen samples of sub-fertile males with the tobacco chewing habit. Settings and Design : Retrospective study was conducted at infertility unit of a tertiary health care center, in a period of 3 years. Materials and Method : Semen of 642 males were analyzed; of them 194 men (30.2%) were tobacco chewers and they were grouped according to their intensity of chewing (<10 and ≥ 10 packets/day). Counts, motility, vitality, and morphology of sperms were analyzed. Results : In tobacco chewers, 66% of subjects were oligozoospermic, 85% asthenozoospermic and 28% teratozoospermic. Sperm counts (odds ratio [OR] =2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-3.09), motility (OR = 3.2; 95% CI: 2.05-4.9), and normal morphology (OR = 8.4; 95% CI: 4.9-14.6) were significantly affected (P = 0.001) in tobacco chewers than the non-chewing group. Further, in comparison to the intensity of tobacco chewing, patients with the intensive practice of using ≥10 packets/day had a significant effect on sperm morphology (P = 0.003, OR = 2.7; 95% CI = 1.41-5.08) only. Structural defects in head (P = 0.001) and cytoplasmic residues (P = 0.001) were found to be positively correlated with the intensive chewing, but no significant changes were found in anomalies in mid-piece and tail. Conclusion : The adverse impact of tobacco chewing on semen parameters was evident even with mild chewers, but with the intensive chewing practice, phenotypes of sperms, mainly defects in the head and cytoplasmic residue were severely affected.


How to cite this article:
Sunanda P, Panda B, Dash C, Ray PK, Padhy RN, Routray P. Prevalence of abnormal spermatozoa in tobacco chewing sub-fertile males.J Hum Reprod Sci 2014;7:136-142


How to cite this URL:
Sunanda P, Panda B, Dash C, Ray PK, Padhy RN, Routray P. Prevalence of abnormal spermatozoa in tobacco chewing sub-fertile males. J Hum Reprod Sci [serial online] 2014 [cited 2020 Jul 10 ];7:136-142
Available from: http://www.jhrsonline.org/article.asp?issn=0974-1208;year=2014;volume=7;issue=2;spage=136;epage=142;aulast=Sunanda;type=0