Journal of Human Reproductive Science
Home Ahead of Print Current Issue Archives
   Bookmark this page Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font size Increase font size    Users online: 1653


 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE Table of Contents   
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 187-193
Prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletion among men with severe semen abnormalities and its correlation with successful sperm retrieval


1 Leeds Centre for Reproductive Medicine, Seacroft Hospital, Leeds, United Kingdom
2 Reproductive Medicine Unit, Christian Medical College and Hospital, Vellore, India
3 Reproductive Medicine Unit, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India
4 Jeevan Mithra Fertility Centre, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
5 Reproductive Medicine Unit, Bangalore Baptist Hospital, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
6 Cytogenetics Unit, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India
7 Cytogenetics Unit, Christian Medical College and Hospital, Vellore, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Korula George
Reproductive Medicine Unit, Bangalore Baptist Hospital, Bengaluru, Karnataka
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-1208.192065

Rights and Permissions

AIM: To estimate the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletion among men with azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia and its correlation with successful surgical sperm retrieval. SETTING AND DESIGN: A prospective study in a tertiary level infertility unit. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a prospective observation study, men with azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia (concentration <5 million/ml) attending the infertility center underwent genetic screening. Peripheral blood karyotype was done by Giemsa banding. Y chromosome microdeletion study was performed by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: The study group consisted of 220 men, 133 of whom had azoospermia and 87 had severe oligozoospermia. Overall, 21/220 (9.5%) men had chromosomal abnormalities and 13/220 (5.9%) men had Y chromosome microdeletions. Chromosomal abnormalities were seen in 14.3% (19/133) of azoospermic men and Y chromosome microdeletions in 8.3% (11/133). Of the 87 men with severe oligozoospermia, chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions were each seen in 2.3% (2/87). Testicular sperm aspiration was done in 13 men and was successful in only one, who had a deletion of azoospermia factor c. CONCLUSIONS: Our study found a fairly high prevalence of genetic abnormality in men with severe semen abnormalities and a correlation of genetic abnormalities with surgical sperm retrieval outcomes. These findings support the need for genetic screening of these men prior to embarking on surgical sperm retrieval and assisted reproductive technology intracytoplasmic sperm injection.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article  Email this article
    

  Similar in PUBMED
    Search Pubmed for
    Search in Google Scholar for
  Related articles
   Citation Manager
  Access Statistics
   Reader Comments
   Email Alert *
   Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2422    
    Printed28    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded150    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal